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Solar Power at Home

Important Update: California Solar Initiative (CSI) applications are no longer being accepted at this time.

Important Consumer Advisory Message

A Friendly Reminder from SCE

Southern California Edison supports customer choice in the installation of solar and respects the business relationship between our customers and any third party vendors or contractors that they work with.

At SCE we are making solar a more feasible option for more homes and businesses and work with our customers and with solar energy companies to help thousands of homeowners and businesses safely install rooftop solar.

We provide customers with information and resources that they can use to make the decision that is most beneficial for them and that makes the most sense for their particular situation.

Some of our customers have reported that they have been contacted by telemarketers or door-to-door salesmen using high pressure tactics or misleading statements to sell solar technology.

Telemarketing is a common tool used by many legitimate businesses to sell goods and services. But as with any large purchase, we encourage our customers who are considering solar to be a wise consumer, study their options, and research any provider or contractor they are considering doing business with.

High-pressure Sales Tactics

“You just won a prize or contest.” Some companies may use special offers or other tactics to force a quick decision. Don’t believe it.

Solution: Take your time researching your options for buying solar. There are many contractor choices with competitive rates. Ask questions. Get at least three quotes. Consult the Find an Active Solar Contractor webpage.

Misleading promises of rebates

Some salespeople may threaten you with the prospect of missing out on rebates or tax credits if you don’t sign up immediately.

Solution: California state rebates are no longer available for existing homes in the PG&E, SCE, and SDG&E territories, and the 30% Federal Investment Tax Credit does not expire until Dec. 31, 2016.

Posing as a government or utility representative

Some telemarketers may use company names that are similar to government agencies in order to schedule a free energy audit. A solar salesperson may then arrive and attempt to sell you their services.

Other documented cases include stories about people visiting your home and falsely posing as a Utility Representative.

Solution: Do your research on any company that attempts to schedule an appointment with you through cold calling or door-to-door sales. Ask for and demand to see credentials, including:

  • Employment identification
  • Utility badge and supervisor information
  • Home Improvement Salesperson (HIS) registration number
  • State contractor license number

How to say “no”

If you feel uncomfortable or don’t trust the person you are dealing with you can simply say:

  • “Thank you, but I don’t accept telephone solicitations. Please do not call again.”
  • “Please send me the information in the mail. I will look it over and contact you if I’m interested. Thank you.”

Remember - never give anyone your account number, monthly statement, Social Security Number, or access to other confidential personal information.

National Do Not Call Registry

Registering your phone number is free and easy. You can register online at www.donotcall.gov or call 1-888-382-1222, TTY 1-866-290-4236 from the phone number you wish to register. Your number will stay registered for five years or until the number is disconnected or you remove the listing.

Resources for complaints

You can file complaints about unwanted telephone calls with:

Ready to take your home solar? Take advantage of net energy metering and the Federal Investment Tax Credit.

Guide to Going Solar

Setting your home up with solar technology can reduce your energy bill and your carbon footprint. We have the information and resources to help you get started.
Green light bulb icon

Step 1: Efficiency First

You can save money in upfront costs by taking simple efficiency measures—like swapping old incandescent lighting for CFL or LED bulbs—to reduce your overall use.

Who: You
How: Consult our Home Energy Guide to find energy saving solutions, ranging from small changes to long-term investments that can significantly impact your energy use.

Green utility worker with hard hat

Step 2: Choose a Contractor

A qualified, licensed solar contractor will provide you with a free home evaluation and comprehensive quote. Obtain and compare multiple bids before beginning.

Who: You
How: If you can, get referrals from friends and neighbors. Another great resource is the California Solar Initiative (CSI)* database of eligible contractors.

Green house icon with solar panels

Step 3: Installation

You’ll need a permit first, and an inspection once your system is in place. Your contractor will often manage both, and installation itself may take as few as three days.

Who: Your contractor
How: Your system should be sized to your home and to your typical energy load. Permits are issued by your city or county, and we may need to inspect your finished system.

Green Meter Icon

Step 4: Net Energy Metering

Be sure to sign up! A net energy meter measures any excess solar energy you generate and put back into the grid and credits your bill.

Who: Your contractor
How: Once your application is approved, your meter will be updated and you are immediately signed up for the rate plan.

An elderly man talking to couple showing a document about solar.

Knowledge Is Power

Get answers about cost, maintenance and operation of solar technology before you install.


A family taking a picture with the solar panel and the installers

Earn Energy Credits

If you generate any of your home’s energy through solar power, be sure to sign up for Net Energy Metering to receive your bill credit.

Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)