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Time-of-Use Rates for Business

Agriculture and Pumping Button
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How Time-Of-Use Rates Work

Time-Of-Use (TOU) is part of a statewide initiative designed to keep the electric grid reliable so everyone will have power when they need it. Unlike current energy rates, TOU rates vary depending on the season and the time of day the energy is used.

Additionally, some TOU rates are calculated based on both your energy demand and consumption. While Demand Charges generally reflect our fixed costs, Energy Charges (consumption) reflect the variable costs you incur during the times your business actually uses available power.

 

Businesses transition to TOU in January 2015 and Agricultural and Pumping transition in February 2015.

It’s All About Timing

While the majority of business customers have already transitioned to TOU rates, the remainder will transition in early 2015. This means that now more than ever, when you use electricity is just as important as how much you use. The following resources can help.

FAQs

Find fast answers to the most common questions regarding TOU.

FAQs Learn More

Contact Us

Call 1-866-743-1645 or email TOUsolutions@sce.com.

We're available Monday–Friday,
7 a.m.–7 p.m. (PT) and Saturday,
8 a.m.–5 p.m. (PT).

Time-Of-Use Rate Periods

There are now different TOU rates depending on the season and the time of day the energy is used. They more accurately reflect the costs of energy at the time it is used. With TOU rates, when you use electricity is as important as how much you use.

The greatest demand on the grid is during on-peak periods. If you can shift energy use to off-peak or mid-peak times, you help reduce strain on the grid.

Man adjusting thermostat

Summer Time-Of-Use Hours

Begins June 1 and continues through October 1.

Time of Use hours for Summer are as follows: off-peak is 11 p.m. - 8 a.m.; mid-peak is 8 a.m. - noon and 6 p.m. - 11 p.m.; on-peak is noon - 6 p.m.; weekends and holidays are off-peak all day.

Winter Time-Of-Use Hours

Begins October 1 and continues through June 1.

Time of Use hours for Winter are as follows: off-peak is 11 p.m. - 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. – 11 p.m.; mid-peak is 8 a.m. – 9  p.m.; weekends and holidays are off-peak all day.
Off-peak hours have the lowest energy charge, mid-peak hours have a medium energy charge, and on-Peak hours have the highest energy charge.

Note: The lower off-peak rate applies on holidays. When any holiday falls on Sunday, the following Monday will be recognized as a holiday. Holidays are New Year’s Day, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas.

Energy-Saving Tips By Business Type

Our experts have put together many effective ways you can reduce your energy use by specific business types. Take a look to learn more:

Retail

Did you know?
Retailers spend $21 billion annually on energy, with nearly 90% of that cost for electricity.1 We help retailers find smart energy - and cost-saving solutions to control energy.

Get Tips

1E Source: Retail www.esource.com

Buildings

Did you know?
Energy usage represents as much as 30% of overall operating costs in office buildings.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration April 12, 2010.

Restaurants

Did you know?
An energy-efficient restaurant operation can achieve up to 30% savings in energy consumption.1

Get Tips

1Food Service Technology Center. www.fishnick.com (accessed June 2009).

Lodging

Did you know?
Electricity use accounts for 46% of the utility costs of a typical hotel.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationSeptember 8, 2009.

Manufacturing

Did you know?
Motors account for 69% of energy use in an average manufacturing facility.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Food Processing

Did you know?
75% of electricity costs at food facilities occur in processing and assembly systems.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Healthcare

Did you know?
The healthcare industry is very energy-intensive and, on average, hospitals use roughly twice as much energy use per square foot as medical office buildings.1

Get Tips

1E Source: www.esource.com

Schools

Did you know?
Lighting accounts for 35% of the energy use in an average university facility.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Agriculture

Did you know?
8 million agriculture acres in California consume 80% of the total water pumped in the state.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Warehousing

Did you know?
On average, electricity represents 25% of a company’s operating cost.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Government

Did you know?
Government buildings use 13% of total office energy use in the United States, and energy represents as much as 30% of a building’s operating costs. In all, state and local government agencies spend more than $12 billion per year on energy.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Water and Wastewater

Did you know?
Aeration is the single largest energy user in the wastewater treatment process and it can account for 45 to 75 percent of a wastewater plant’s total electricity consumption.1

Get Tips

1E Source: Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.